ArbNet.org is the online community for arboreta
 

Welcome to ArbNet, the interactive community of arboreta. On future visits to this home page, you'll find arboreta featured from The Morton Register, as well as other enhancements. This website will evolve -- and much of that depends on how you use the site. In addition to the database of arboreta (The Morton Register), there are sections for user interaction, news, events, and resources, such as an accreditation program for arboreta. Please click through and become familiar with this site and what it has to offer you and our shared community of arboreta!

The Harold L. Lyon Arboretum Awarded Level IV Accreditation

The Harold L. Lyon Arboretum has been awarded a Level IV Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the arboretum tells their story:

The University of Hawai'i at Mānoa is one of only 32 institutions nationwide to hold the distinction of being a land‐, sea‐, and space‐grant research institution, and the only university in the United States that owns and operates a botanical garden in a tropical rainforest. The Harold L. Lyon Arboretum is located on 193 acres in upper Mānoa Valley, O'ahu, and maintains a world‐renowned collection of more than 5,000 plant taxa primarily from Hawai'i, and the sub‐tropical and tropical areas of the world. The plant collections are diverse, and include living specimens that range from common to extremely rare in their native habitat, as well as tropical ornamentals and economically and culturally important crop plants.

The Lyon Arboretum was originally established as the Mānoa Arboretum in 1918 by the Hawai'i Sugar Planters Association primarily for the purpose of watershed research. Since 1970, the Lyon Arboretum has become a full service public outreach facility whose mission is "to increase the appreciation of the unique flora of Hawai'i and the tropics, by conserving, curating, and studying plants and their habitats; providing inclusive educational opportunities; encouraging use by the broader community; and supporting the educational, scientific, and service activities of the University of Hawai'i."

Lyon Arboretum's research emphasis on conservation biology and horticultural specialization has led to the development of its Hawaiian Rare Plant Program (HRPP) which, for over 20 years, has focused on the rescue and recovery of Hawai'i's most critically endangered native plants through the use of micropropagation. In the late 1990s, the program expanded to include research on seed storage behavior of native Hawaiian plant species, and in 2000 began to formally initiate long-term seed storage with the creation of the Seed Conservation Laboratory.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

The University of Northern Colorado Campus Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Universityof Northern Colorado Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the arboretum tells their story:

Located in Greeley, Colorado, the University of Northern Colorado Campus Arboretum is set on a 250-acre campus. As the university celebrates its 125th birthday, designation as an Accredited Arboretum reflects the dreams of the First President, Dr. Zachariah Snyder and Landscape Architect Hans Hockbaum (of Cornell University).

 Established in 1889, UNC fosters education about the science, beauty and importance of water conservation in this semi-arid North American region. The Campus Arboretum displays a collection of plants native to the Front Range region of Colorado and also of ecosystems around the world. Open to the public, the Campus Arboretum encompasses the grounds of many historic and contemporary buildings, displaying and interpreting its woody plant collections in a manner that reveals a sense of place in Northern Colorado. The historic landscape features more than 3,700 trees and hundreds of different woody plants with some heritage trees more than 100 years old. 

Over its 125-year history, UNC has been dedicated to its campus landscape, and its collections, displays, tree trails, and activities—as well as its commitment to environmental sustainability—help the Campus Arboretum enrich campus as a showplace and a home for all its students, staff, faculty and visitors.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

The Newport Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Newport Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how The Newport Arboretum tells their story:

The city of Newport, Rhode Island is a living museum of American history, and our botanical heritage is no small part of our story. During the Gilded Age, collectors, scientists and amateur horticulturists planted our city with an incredible array of specimen trees, many of which were gathered by tree hunters from across the globe.

The Newport Tree Society was founded in 1987 when concerned citizens recognized the fact that our once-legendary urban forest was clearly aging and ailing. For the first time since the end of the Gilded Age, Newport's public trees began to benefit from formal planning and active regeneration efforts via a comprehensive tree protection and management plan. The majority of the city's finest specimen trees, however, are found on private landscapes. In response to the challenge of restoring a forest under the direct care of thousands of private citizens, the Newport Tree Society outlined a new citizen-centered model for citywide reforestation centered around The Newport Arboretum, New England's first citywide arboretum, established in 2011.

The heart of this reforestation plan lies in heritage horticulture, the celebration of our city's long history of exploratory arboriculture and its remaining core of historic designed landscapes and plant collections. From handwritten records of expansive colonial-era hothouses that held specimens from all over the globe, to the scores of Gilded Age landscapes still in cultivation on our island today, Newport is a truly a jewel of American horticulture and landscape architecture. Our goal is to remember and reignite our once burning passion for sylviculture by reforesting all four corners of our city with truly special specimen trees planted by private citizens on both public and private property.

Ultimately, we seek to create a citywide arboretum with collections unparalleled in scope and depth — and to do so by designing and implementing sustainable processes that may one day be modeled by communities across the globe.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Wesleyan College Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Wesleyan College Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Wesleyan College Arboretum tells their story:

The Wesleyan College Arboretum is a 104-acre preserve devoted to education, research, and conservation. The forest that is now designated the Wesleyan College Arboretum has been part of historic Wesleyan College's campus since the college moved from its original 1836 location in downtown Macon to its current location in 1928. Located right on the boundary between the Piedmont and the Coastal Plain in the middle of Georgia, the Wesleyan College Arboretum boasts a rich floristic diversity typical of a southern temperate zone forest, with about 105 native species of trees, shrubs, and woody vines. The second-growth forest is dominated by oaks, hickories, and loblolly pine, with a smattering of southern magnolia, flowering dogwood, and beech.

Designation of the 104-acre forest as an "Arboretum" in 1997 helped elevate the status of the forest, and more attention was given to maintaining the trails and using the Arboretum for teaching and research. Since 2010, however, the pace has quickened. An influx of donations and grant money has allowed for the construction of a pavilion and fire circle, development of new trails, upgrades to the rustic Anderson cabin, large-scale removal of invasive plants (privet, thorny olive, and wisteria) and restoration of native trees and shrubs. Finally, with the development of engaging public programs and events, and the labeling of plants in the Arboretum, we qualify for accreditation, a milestone that the Arboretum Committee has been working toward for over fifteen years.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Taltree Arboretum & Gardens Awarded Level III Accreditation

The Taltree Arboretum & Gardens has been awarded a Level III Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Taltree Arboretum & Gardens tells their story:

Taltree Arboretum & Gardens is a 360-acre, dog-friendly oak preserve of formal gardens, woodlands, wetlands and prairies that offers a variety of educational and outdoor experiences. The arboretum encompasses one of the most diverse collections of oak species in the nation and has created a safe haven for many rare plant and animal species through its restoration of the Northwest Indiana native landscape.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Basalt Midland Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Basalt Midland Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Basalt Midland Arboretum tells their story:

The town of Basalt is a small community nestled in the central Rocky Mountains between juniper-pinon woodlands to the north and to the south lie the confluence of the Roaring Fork and Frying Pan Rivers, which flow through the heart of town. Basalt's rich and storied history is shaped by the Colorado Midland Railway when in November of 1887 the tracks were laid down First Street, now Midland Avenue. The railroad whistles no longer in the Basalt air as cars, bicycles and pedestrians make their way through town.

The Basalt Midland Arboretum is contained within the town's parks, open space and rights of way and has catalogued 168 species of trees and shrubs. Our horticulture and forestry staff is dedicated to the practice and advancement of sustainable land stewardship and promoting ecological conservation principals in public horticulture and arboriculture in managing the town's ninety gardens and three thousand trees. Our staff leads guided tours of the gardens which focus on creating and maintaining desirable, thriving and water-wise landscapes that provide a continual season of bloom in our semi-arid mountain climate. Our elevation is 6624'.

Basalt's landscapes instill a quiet and appealing aesthetic that touches the lives of its community and visitors every day and it is this important community asset that we preserve and protect for our future generations.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Agnes Scott Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Agnes Scott Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Agnes Scott Arboretum tells their story:

The Agnes Scott Arboretum is an extension and reflection of the liberal arts curriculum of Agnes Scott College, a historic college for women in Atlanta, Georgia. Since 1889, Agnes Scott College has educated women to think deeply, live honorably, and engage the intellectual and social challenges of their times. Its 100-acre campus is home to more than 2000 trees, which contribute greatly to its reputation as one of the most beautiful colleges in the country. Some of its notable trees were donated by alumnae and planted by members of the faculty, staff, and student body.

The arboretum was established in 2012 to encourage people to reflect on the complex associations between trees and humans and on the integral role that trees play in our lives. Its growing catalog of trees has been organized by interdisciplinary themes derived from the college's curriculum: for example, trees in the arts, trees as carbon sinks, biodiversity, tree structure in human thought, psychological benefits of trees, and many more. The arboretum makes optimal use of digital technology to connect visitors via smart devices to a website, where they can read or listen to explanations of the various topics. Each "location" in the arboretum, physical and virtual, is carefully designed to educate visitors about a key concept, focus on a single tree species, and highlight some aspect of the college itself. For example, a stand of eastern hemlocks (Tsuga canadensis) near the college's interfaith chapel serves as the centerpiece of a short history of sacred trees.

The Agnes Scott Arboretum is already drawing heightened attention, both on campus and off, to the priceless asset that is the college's tree canopy. Recently designated as a Tree Campus USA by the Arbor Day Foundation, Agnes Scott College is now partnering with the U.S. Forest Service's Centers for Urban and Interface Forestry on an innovative, six-month audit of every component in the college's urban forest management program. It is the hope of the arboretum's supporters that, in the years to come, the Agnes Scott Arboretum will help recruit and inspire successive generations of tree advocates, who will ensure that the college never loses its distinction as a wooded oasis in the midst of the sprawling city of Atlanta.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Ed Leuck Louisiana Academic Arboretum Awarded Level II Accreditation

Ed Leuck Louisiana Arboretum has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how Ed Leuck Louisiana Academic Arboretum tells their story:

The Ed Leuck Louisiana Academic Arboretum is located in Shreveport, Louisiana, at the center of the Centenary College of Louisiana campus. The area of the arboretum covers approximately three acres of the campus and remains free and open to the public 24 hours a day, all year round.

The Arboretum was established in 1984, at the behest of Harry Balcom, college Board of Trustees member, and Donald Webb, the college President, with Mr. Balcom providing the necessary funds. The present arboretum site was chosen both for its proximity to foot traffic and its poor physical condition. Construction of a dam to ensure a permanent aquatic habitat, the installation of sprinklers and the layout and carving of a system of walking paths were completed in the fall of 1984. The first plantings were made by Professor Ed Leuck in the spring of 1985. Plants have subsequently been continuously added. In recent years, as trees and shrubs become larger, the addition of woody plants to the collection has slowed, and more attention is now given to observing and encouraging diversity in the herbaceous component. The Arboretum collection comprises 190 woody native plant species, 14 woody exotic plant species, and more than 70 non-woody native plant species.

The collection of the Arboretum is intended to serve both an aesthetic purpose and an educational purpose. Campus beautification was the initial motivating force behind the establishment of the Arboretum. The idea was to make a poorly vegetated slope aesthetically pleasing, while also using this same area of the campus as a test garden for plantings elsewhere on campus. With its founding, the Arboretum was also meant to serve a teaching purpose, both for Centenary College classes as well as the local community. The original Arboretum director, Professor Ed Leuck, intended to showcase native species of the southeast, with a special push for those native to northwest Louisiana. The carefully labeled woody and non-woody plants help members of the campus community and campus visitors appreciate the richness of native species.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Pine Hollow Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

Pine Hollow Arboretum has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how Pine Hollow Arboretum tells their story:

The Pine Hollow Arboretum is a 25-acre property located in Slingerlands, New York. In 1966, founder John W. Abbuhl, M.D. started planting trees around his home to create an attractive setting. His affinity with the land, his interest in horticulture and his love of trees combined to inspire the creation of an arboretum. Over the ensuing decades, Dr. Abbuhl has added over 3,400 woody plantings to the collection and, in doing so, has transformed the property into an aesthetically pleasing, yet gently groomed landscape. In his words, the guiding principle has been "trees in a natural environment" and "to allow the land to tell me what to do". In 2007, the Pine Hollow Arboretum became a non-profit corporation and in 2012 became permanently certified by the NYS Education Department.

The overall mission of The Pine Hollow Arboretum is to preserve, manage and enhance native and introduced species of trees, shrubs and other plants in a natural and aesthetic environment. This mission fosters environmental stewardship through habitat conservation practices and promotes the natural processes of forest ecosystems while maintaining the aesthetic quality of the arboretum's grounds. The integrity and viability of the natural landscape is preserved through ecologically conscious management practices and therefore supports extensive networks of forest dependent organisms.

The arboretum's cataloged collection consists of over 3,300 unique trees, shrubs and other woody plants from around the world, some of which are rare and/or endangered. This living collection, representing over 180 genera, is aesthetically arranged in a natural setting that includes 12 ponds and an Eastern White Pine forest. The collection is primarily organized throughout the property by geographic origin (i.e. the Russian Pond, the Western Glade, etc.) with some areas devoted to certain species, such as firs and magnolias (i.e. the Fir Trail, the Magnolia Field, etc). Furthermore, specimens are placed in locations that appropriately match soil and moisture requirements to encourage viability and vigor. A network of walking trails and bridges throughout the preserve allows visitors of all ages to enjoy the entire property.

The grounds are open daily from dawn to dusk, 365 days a year. Admission is free, though we do encourage visitors to consider becoming a member to help support the arboretum. A Self-Guided Tour brochure of our 30 most significant trees is available on-site and online.  

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

St. Mary's Arboretum Association Awarded Level II Accreditation

St. Mary's Arboretum Association has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how St Mary's Arboretum Association tells their story:

The St. Mary's Arboretum Association was formed in August 2010, and from its inception its primary purpose has been to beautify and improve the grounds of St. Mary's College. The arboretum showcases a variety of southern Maryland plant life. Land and water come together as plants large and small help maintain and filter soil and waters flowing into the St. Mary's River, and the river's currents and wildlife in turn influence what thrives along the shoreline and surrounding acreage.

The arboretum's 360-plus acres encompass extremely fragile waterside acreage. The arboretum provides an important buffer from impacts to the watershed by land maintenance and stabilization. Additionally, it is a home for migratory and native bird and insect populations.

The arboretum currently has 198 trees and shrubs cataloged. Together with students, faculty, staff and local volunteers, the St. Mary's College grounds department cares for the arboretum's grounds and furthers its goals.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum Awarded Level II Accreditation

Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum tells their story:

Gizella Kopsick Palm Arboretum (GKPA) is a 2 1/2 acre palm and cycad arboretum located within St. Petersburg Florida's downtown waterfront parks. It showcases well over 500 palm trees and 150 cycads. A destination for palm and cycad enthusiasts, tourists, and community residents, GKPA is a perfect place to engage visitors with the icons of the tropics.

The arboretum was created in 1976 from a generous donation of stock by city resident Gizella Kopsick, who loved palm trees. GKPA is free to the public and is maintained and operated by the City Beautiful Commission (CBC) of St. Petersburg, FL, in conjunction with the City of St. Petersburg's Parks and Recreation Department. Over the years GKPA has encompassed leaders with visionary and knowledgeable insights which have helped define its status as the only tropical arboretum of its kind within the Western Hemisphere.

The arboretum which is located along the waterfront in downtown St. Petersburg has hundreds of visitors introduced to a tropical collection that creates a special memory that they may otherwise never have experienced. GKPA features 200 species of palms and 90 species of cycads. Many of the species are threatened and endangered as noted on the ICUN redlist and the CITES websites. The arboretum includes all 14 Florida-native species. With a collection as diverse as this, the visitor leaves with an impression of gratitude and new-found appreciation for nature's tropical wonders.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens Awarded Level I Accreditation

Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how Naples Zoo tells their story:

As its name indicates, Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens is a zoo nestled within a garden. Already nationally accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums for their fauna, the institution's new ArbNet Arboreteum accreditation highlights their floral treasures and ongoing commitment to the historic botanical collection as well as ensuring itself as a public resource for botanical collections, horticultural information, and the natural enjoyment of all guests.

The legacy of plantings began in 1919 by Dr. Henry Nehrling with additional plantings added in the 1950s and 60s by Julius Fleischmann and from 1969 through 2005 by the Tetzlaff family Today, as a nonprofit 501(c)(3), the zoo and gardens continue to be managed to delight visitors while nurturing the historic botanicals and planting new specimens to beautifully blend the tropical plants with the exotic wildlife. Notable plantings include multiple mature Ficus species (F.altissima, F. lutea, F. benghalensis, F. macrocarpa, F. microcarpa (nitida), F. sycamorus) throughout the garden. Large specimen trees on site include Pterocarpus indicus, Tectona grandis, Araucaria bidwillii, Ceiba pentandra, and Cananga odorata.

In addition to caring for the trees on site, Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens funds the planting of at least 100,000 trees every year in Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Chatham University Arboretum Awarded Level II Accreditation

Chatham University Arboretum has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how Chatham University tells their story:

With elements designed for the Andrew Mellon estate by the renowned Olmsted Brothers, Chatham's 39-acre campus encompasses a 32-acre designated arboretum featuring 115 different varieties of species, including dawn redwood, bald cypress, yellowwood, katsura tree, cucumber magnolia, and Carolina silverbell. The arboretum provides an outdoor classroom for students in the University's Landscape Architecture and Landscape Studies programs and an inviting place to stroll and to meditate.

Chatham University, founded in 1869, is located in the vibrant Shadyside neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pa. preparing students from around the world, Chatham's enrollment throughout the past decade was the fastest growing in the Pittsburgh region.

With enrollment of more than 2,300 students and consisting of an undergraduate women's college and co-educational graduate and online programs, Chatham has consistently been ranked among the top master's level institutions in the Northeast by U.S. News & World Report and The Princeton Review.

Offering challenging academics and innovative programming in the fields of sustainability and the environment, health and lab sciences, creative and liberal arts, and business and entrepreneurship, a Chatham education is designed to meet the needs of tomorrow's economy, today. Widely recognized for its commitment to the environment, Chatham's new Eden Hall Campus, opening in fall 2013, is the first campus in the world to be built from the ground up as a living and learning laboratory for sustainability. As the future home of our School of Sustainability and the Environment, students will have the opportunity to explore and discover next generation solutions in the areas of energy and climate, water, food and sustainable agriculture, planning and design, and community and health.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

Delaware State University Arboretum Awarded Level II Accreditation

Delaware State University(DSU) Arboretum has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how DSU tells their story:

The Delaware State University (DSU) Arboretum is on the 400-acre main campus in Dover, the state capital of Delaware, located on the coastal plain of the eastern USA (USDA zone 7). The Arboretum is comprised of the hundreds of planted campus trees, totaling 172 different species of trees and shrubs (114 tree species, 58 shrub species). Each species is labeled; and a map of these trees/shrubs, with lists of scientific and common names with map coordinates, is on the DSU Arboretum brochure. The trees are documented with species descriptions, GPS locations, pressed plant voucher specimens, photographs, and scanned herbarium specimen images.

The DSU Arboretum tree and shrub collection is diverse, and valuable for teaching, research, and aesthetic purposes. The 68 native species, which represent 40% of the total 172 species, also have ecological importance. The collection includes unique trees, such as a state record shingle oak, the second largest in Delaware; and a large black walnut, which is on the waiting list for state record tree. Recent plantings were selected to further increase the diversity of trees on campus, and for their educational, ecological, and ornamental value. These include Delaware natives such as beach plum, American chestnut, and chinquapin. Some intriguing non-native species are monkey puzzle tree, franklinia, and umbrella-pine. The DSU Arboretum beautifies the campus in all seasons, especially with spring-flowering trees, and fall foliage.

The Arboretum is used for teaching about trees and conservation to DSU students, as well as members of the public. This includes undergraduate and graduate courses such as Systematic Botany, Field Botany, Dendrology, Horticultural Plant Materials, and even an English Literature "nature poetry walk"; as well as outreach programs like Master Gardener training, Teacher In-Service classes, Woodland Classroom program for elementary school children, and monthly nature walks.

Delaware State University, a historically black university, was founded in 1891, and some of the larger trees are probably at least that old; the historic Loockerman House dates to the 1700's. Over the years, the campus tree collection has grown through the efforts of numerous individuals, including the active participation of faculty, staff, students and volunteers. The DSU Arboretum was formally designated in 2012, following recent plantings that resulted in a 26% increase in the number of tree species, through the DSU Claude E. Phillips Herbarium, in the Dept. of Agriculture and Natural Resources, College of Agriculture and Related Sciences. Additionally, in 2011, DSU became the first Tree Campus USA in Delaware.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

West Laurel Hill Cemetery Awarded Level II Accreditation

West Laurel Hill Cemetery has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the West Laurel Hill Cemetery tells their story:

"West Laurel Hill has indeed been an arboretum through its 144 years since founder John Jay Smith set forth to create a garden cemetery," commented West Laurel Hill President and CEO, Pete Hoskins. "The Morton accreditation is an honor and a call to continue the professional commitment to education and care of one of the region's finest tree collections." With over 187 acres of rolling hills, West Laurel Hill has retained nearly all of its original landscape design and tree collection.

West Laurel Hill Cemetery is open to the public daily and includes seasonal arboretum tours conducted by Brian Terraciano, our International Society for Arboriculture Certified Arborist. 

Incorporated in 1869, Historic West Laurel Hill Cemetery is a privately-owned, non-profit, non-denominational cemetery, a 187 acre arboretum and an outdoor sculpture garden rich in cultural and social history. 

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

The Ohio State University Chadwick Arboretum & Learning Gardens Awarded Level II Accreditation

The Ohio State University Chadwick Arboretum & Learning Gardens has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Chadwick Arboretum tells their story:

The Ohio State University Chadwick Arboretum & Learning Gardens was established on July 11, 1980 and named to honor Dr. Lewis C. Chadwick, a respected faculty member in Horticulture from 1929 until his retirement in 1967. At that time, the arboretum included several acres of gardens along Lane Avenue, a main thoroughfare of Ohio State's Columbus campus. With the addition of a 3.5 acre lake and surrounding land in 1989, the Richard and Annette Bloch Cancer Survivors' Plaza in 1995 and additional acreage in front of Howlett Hall - home to Chadwick's headquarters - and the current construction of a 12,000 square foot green roof, Chadwick has grown to a green reserve of 60 acres within the 1,600 acre Ohio State campus which is mostly in an urban setting.

Chadwick's mission is to honor Ohio State's land-grant tradition by using plants for education and enjoyment. Currently there are over 3,000 trees and woody plants in Chadwick's collection representing 135 genera, nearly 400 separate species and hybrids and close to 350 cultivars. The collection includes one State Champion tree, a Greek fir (Abies cephalonica). The arboretum is also a peaceful place for respite and features a Chartres-style labyrinth as a place for meditation and reflection.

Academically, Chadwick Arboretum & Learning Gardens serves as an outdoor classroom and laboratory for the university, mainly in the areas of horticulture, landscape architecture and natural resources but with other disciplines represented, including civil and mechanical engineering and geography. Chadwick also provides student internships to about 10 students annually and there are many programs available to the public including Arbor Day celebrations, Chadwick's spring plant sale, a plastic pot recycling event, the "ArboBlitz" tree celebration, weekly campus tree mapping, annual cultivar trials, labyrinth walks, the Horticultural Therapy Program for adults with developmental disabilities, Phenology Research Garden monitoring and more. Many of the programs offer numerous volunteer opportunities. Chadwick's substantial group of enthusiastic volunteers devoted over 7,200 hours to the arboretum in 2012. Chadwick also hosts conferences and seminars for professional and industry groups.

A description of Chadwick Arboretum & Learning Gardens would not be complete without mentioning the deep loyalty and dedication that employees, students and volunteers feel toward the arboretum and its Director, Mary Maloney. This esprit de corps is ever present and ensures that, every week, something magic happens at Chadwick. All 60 acres of the arboretum are open and free to the public 365 days a year. Guided tours are also available.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

The Botanic Garden of Smith College Awarded Level III Accreditation

The Botanic Garden of Smith College has been awarded a Level III Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Smith College tells their story:

Located in Northampton, Massachusetts, the Botanic Garden of Smith College is set on a 125-acre campus landscape. Smith College's first president had a vision for the entire campus to be a botanic garden and an arboretum having scientific as well as aesthetic value. The original campus plan was designed by the firm of Olmsted, Olmsted, and Elliot.

Since its founding in 1895, the Botanic Garden of Smith College has been functioning as an institution that fosters education about the science, beauty, and importance of the plant kingdom, serving as a living museum of plants native to New England and ecosystems around the world. Open to the publics, the garden encompasses an arboretum that is intermingled among historic and contemporary buildings, specialty gardens, a 12,000 square foot glass conservatory, and an exhibition gallery. Goals are collection and display, education, research, and conservation. Over 10,000 documented, labeled, and mapped plants are broadly representative of both native and non-native species, ranging from cultivars of landscape plants to wild-collected species with provenance that underpins our conservation efforts. The plant database is accessible online through BGCI and the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh multisite. Tropical and temperate seed are made available via Index Seminum (seed exchange program) and germplasm is shared with researchers around the world.

The tree and shrub collections are comprised of species hardy in New England (including an area of native New England trees) and tropical and subtropical species in the glass conservatory. Campus gardens include a systematics garden, woodland and wildflower garden, and a rock garden, created in 1897, making it the oldest rock garden in North America. Additionally, there are display and teaching gardens. The historic landscape features 1,214 different woody plants with some heritage trees that are over one hundred years old. These include Ginkgo biloba, Sciadopitys verticillata, and Ulmus glabra 'Camperdownii'. A giant Metasequoia glyptostroboides, grown from seed collected in China in the 1940s, graces central campus. The Lyman Conservatory houses both herbaceous and woody plants, the latter totaling 319 taxa. This collection features ornamentals such as Osa pulchra and Strongylodon macrobotrys, economic crops such as coffee, cacao, and rubber, in addition to endangered species, including Cupressus dupreziana, C. vietnamensis, Acer skutchii, and Amentotaxus yunnanensis, and Podocarpus matudae.

Visitors are treated to an extraordinary array of rare and unusual plants and garden displays, including the spectacular annual Spring Bulb Show and the Fall Chrysanthemum Show. Education is accomplished through lectures, brochures, audio and guided tours, web site, interpretive signage, and a mapping kiosk. Changing educational exhibits are presented in our exhibition gallery and a permanent installation of 178 Woods of the World, which includes an informative brochure and explanations of wood grain and figure. The Friends of the Botanic Garden and an active volunteer group support educational programming. Over 1500 school children receive tours each year and an equal number explore on their own. In addition to the Department of Biological Sciences, faculty in disciplines ranging from engineering to dance are assisted in incorporating the use of the plant collections in their classroom teaching. Interns, research assistants, and work-study students are given the opportunity to learn through hands-on experience in gardens, conservatory and arboretum.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

The Fell Arboretum Awarded Level II Accreditation

The Fell Arboretum has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Fell Arbortum tells their story:

Jesse Fell is one of the most renowned founders of the University and the Town of Normal, he is remembered as a "lover and planter of trees" with his hopes being that every kind of tree that would flourish in Central Illinois would be planted on the University's grounds so that the studies of botany and forestry could be pursued.

In 1867 Jesse Fell obtained funds from the state legislature for campus landscaping and planted approximately 1,740 trees that year and another 107 the following. Although his original goal was never realized, his principles hold true for the University today and with a firm foundation laid by Fell we now have an impressive collection of trees on campus.

Fell Arboretum continually strives to exemplify the vision of our forefather Jesse Fell in providing our University community, as well as the communities that surround us with an opportunity to experience a unique and diverse plant collection that is conducive to the studies of botany, horticulture and forestry, in an environmentally sounds and sustainable manner

In order to continue this vision, the University applied for and was granted in 1995 status as an official arboretum. Situated on over 400 acres, the Arboretum consists of thousands of trees representing over 100 species. The history of tree planting on the University is rich with the vision of forefather Jesse Fell to this day, those involved with the Fell Arboretum work together to carry forward Fell's vision and strive to preserve and expand the existing campus landscape that serves both as an aesthetic experience for our campus community and visitors as well as a living, learning laboratory.

The Fell Arboretum is committed to collecting diverse species of trees and other plants integrated with art and architecture on the campus of Illinois State University with the principal goal being to sustain a living laboratory as both an educational resource and an aesthetic experience. We also strive to incorporate and promote environmentally safe and sustainable practices in order to preserve and protect that which has been given to us.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

The Acton Arboretum Awarded Level II Accreditation

 

The Acton Arboretum has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how The Acton Arbortum tells their story:

The Acton Arboretum is situated on 65 acres of town conservation land in the heart of Town Center, Acton, Massachusetts. The Arboretum boasts a trail system through open meadows, beside woodland ponds, along a glacial esker, and through a bog. A handicapped accessible trail provides access to the herb garden, butterfly garden, hosta garden, daylily garden, rhododendron garden, lilac fragrance garden, and a pond wetland. The Wildflower Trail provides access to a wide range of woodland habitats. Parking is available at the Arboretum's main entrance, off Taylor Road. Much of the area adjacent to the parking lot is handicapped-accessible, and is open, with stone-dust or paved paths, gardens, bridges, and picnic tables. Trails and paths crisscross the entire area.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

  

The Tasmanian Arboretum Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Tasmanian Arboretum, Devonport, Australia has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the the Tasmanian Arbortum tells their story:

The Tasmanian Arboretum is an Incorporated Association, that is it is owned by its members. On the north facing coast of Tasmania in the hill behind Devonport it is on a limestone geology. Numbering over 4,600 living specimens, the plantings display the largest private collection of woody temperate flora in Australia. With an elevation of between 30 and 80 metres [100 and 250 ft] and containing slopes, flood plains and springs, they are able to grow a wide variety of plants in their USDA zone 7 climate. The property is also bounded by several large areas of local vegetation where with their fauna. It is situated on 66 hectares [155 acres] with remnant local vegetation on the limestone rock outcrops. The dominant tree on this geology is the white gum [Eucalyptus viminals] a tree that lives to about 200 years old.

The Arboretum was founded by members of the local community in 1984 for the purpose of collecting and displaying woody plants of the temperate world. The mission is evolving with a present focus on preservation of rare and endangered flora from high altitude forest along the East Coast of Australia. An education program is run to develop a appreciation of, and enlightenment about plants among school students. It also serves a scientific and educational purpose, currently demonstrating the breadth of flora that can grow in the Tasmanian climate through our displays. Since human activities are putting much of the world's flora at risk, the mission also includes preservation of the germplasm of endangered plants.

A major focus is the Southern Hemisphere flora, conifers, Nothofagus species and members of the Protea family. The Arboretum is recognized as containing one of the most complete living collections of Tasmanian woody flora. We also collect exotic species from heritage plantings as a means of providing a secure resource for landscape restoration. The Arboretum is a popular visitor attraction for its walks, its wildlife including resident platypus and for its peaceful ambience. Those interested in learning more about may take a guided walk, hire an audio tour or read the interpretation panels.

Approximately 20 ha [50 acres] of land is in varying degrees of biophysical naturalness, the most degraded undergoing active restoration. The goal is to restore the grassy woodland found on these limestone outcrops. Land along the edges of the 2 watercourses on the property is planted out to local vegetation including an area dedicated to capturing and sinking Carbon.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
  

The Helen Avalynne Tawes Garden Awarded Level I Accreditation

The Helen Avalynne Tawes Garden has been awarded a Level I Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how the Helen Avalynne Tawes Garden tells their story:

Sometimes referred to as "Annapolis's best kept secret" the Tawes Garden is nestled amid state government office buildings that include the headquarters of the Department of Natural Resources. The garden is named in honor of Mrs. J. Millard Tawes, a former first lady of Maryland. She and Governor Tawes were the state's gracious hosts from 1959-1967.

Sprouting from a flat cinder lot in 1975, the garden has matured into an Annapolis destination with representations of the state's various geographic areas featured in this five-acre garden in the heart of the city. In addition to pleasant ponds and many cultivated plantings, the barrier-free garden has a "Maryland-in-miniature" theme containing a Western Maryland forest, a streamside environment and an Eastern Shore peninsula. This award winning garden is open daily from dawn until dusk; admission and guided tours are free of charge.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
 
  

Cox Arboretum Awarded Level II Accreditation

Cox Arboretum, Canton, GA. has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how Cox Arboretum tells their story:

Cox Arboretum is a private estate located in Canton, Georgia. Canton is approximately 40 miles north of Atlanta in the foothills of the Piedmont Range. Numbering over 4,000 living specimens, the plantings display one of the largest private collections of temperate flora in the United States. With an elevation of 1200 feet and containing several lakes and streams, they are able to grow a wide variety of plants in their zone 7B climate. The property is also bounded by several large wetland habitats where many migratory and native fowl make their home. It is situated on 13 acres in the middle of an old-growth southern deciduous hardwood forest, containing many large Oaks, Hickory, Poplar and Sweetgum – some of which are over 100 years old.

The Arboretum was founded by Tom and Evelyn Cox in 1990 for the purpose of collecting garden-worthy plants. Throughout the years the mission has evolved with a present focus on plant evaluation, preservation of rare and endangered flora and to develop a public appreciation and enlightenment of plants. It also serves a scientific and educational purpose, through testing and displaying new and rare plants from around the world in a garden setting. Since human activities such as clearing forest have put much of the world's flora at risk, the mission also includes preservation of the germplasm of many critically endangered plants.

A major focus today is conifers, maples and magnolia at the genus/species level, as well as dwarf cultivar selections that may have commercial appeal. The arboretum is recognized as containing one of the most complete collections of species conifers in the U.S. Throughout the year, they receive numerous plants from growers and horticultural institutions for the purpose of evaluation. Through this effort and in offering tours to the public, they are seeking to expand the plant palate in the southeastern U.S. Cox Arboretum is a popular visitor attraction for those interested in learning more about plants. This includes guided walks that include history of trees as well as their many scientific applications.

Approximately 3 acres of land is maintained in a natural state and remains undisturbed. The goal is to maintain and ultimately increase native species diversity of both flora and fauna.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
 
  

Donald E. Davis Arboretum Awarded Level III Accreditation

Donald E. Davis Arboretum has been awarded a Level III Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how Donald E. Davis Arboretum tells their story:

The Donald E. Davis Davis Arboretum is a collection of the native plants of the Southeastern US. It is a part of Auburn University's Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Science and Mathematics. The Arboretum is situated on 14 acres of the University's main campus and is currently celebrating its 50th anniversary. The garden has a strong focus on Alabama's plants and natural habitats. The core collections of the Arboretum include oaks, carnivorous plants and native azaleas. The Arboretum is actively involved in plant conservation through the Alabama Plant Conservation Alliance. The Arboretum has become a showcase for sustainable practices on campus including stormwater management. The Arboretum contains a branch of Town Creek that winds through the garden and is connected to a wide floodplain. Installations throughout the Arboretum teach patrons how our water is cared for using including raingardens, dry streambeds, berms, swales, pervious concrete, interpretative signage and a stormwater cellphone tour.

The Arboretum offers educational programming for all ages, and serves as an extension of the classrooms for most of the colleges on campus. Local school children and master gardeners share the opportunity to come immerse themselves in a variety of recreated environments and meet the plant communities associated with them. Visitors will find representations of Alabama's Coastal Dunes, Blackbelt prairies, Longleaf Pine Savannah's, Pitcher Plant Bogs, Sandstone Rock outcrops, Dolomitic Limestone Glades, and even shaded slopes from the foothills of the Appalachian Mountians. All of these installations are used to teach the volume and value of the immense biodiversity that grows in Alabama.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
 
  

Boerner Botanical Gardens Awarded Level II Accreditation

Boerner Botanical Gardens has been awarded a Level II Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, they are now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how Boerner Botanical Gardens tells their story:

Boerner Botanical Gardens (BBG), part of the Gold Medal Milwaukee County Parks system, is the oldest nationally recognized public garden in the Great Lakes region. Built in the 1930's, the Gardens were developed as a cooperative effort between Milwaukee County Parks Department, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), and the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Located within Whitnall Park, BBG is comprised of the forty acre formal gardens, and the Arboretum plantings along the parkways.

The Formal Gardens are comprised of outdoor "rooms" devoted to specialty gardens including the Rose Garden, Perennial Mall, Herb Garden, Shrub Mall, Peony Garden, Daylily Path, Annual Garden, and Rock Garden. The John Voight Memorial Trial Garden, established in 1953, is one of the few municipally operated trial gardens in the US, and is an official test site for All American Selections (AAS) and the American Garden Awards (AGW). It is also a test site for the Earth-Kind Rose Field Trials and the Earth-Kind Hydrangea Field Trials. The newest addition the Gardens is the Rain Water Harvest demonstration site, which captures parking lot runoff and biofilters and aerates the water for reuse.

The Gardens and Arboretum is host to many impressive plant collections, including Street Tree, Nut Tree, Tree Peony, and Conifer collections. Boerner Botanical Gardens is an American Hosta Society National Display Garden, and an American Hemerocallis Society Display Garden. The Rose Garden has about three hundred rose varieties, and over three thousand plants. The Peony Garden has upwards of one hundred and seventy five peony varieties. Of special note is the flowering Crabapple collection, which is one of the largest in the country.

The Education and Visitor Center was built in 2001-02 to provide the necessary space and amenities for the many visitors who come to Boerner Botanical Gardens to learn, enjoy, and escape. It includes classrooms, meeting halls, and a soaring glass atrium that brings some of the beauty of nature indoors. Great care was taken to match the exterior stonework of the Visitor's Center to the original Gardens headquarters, the Garden House. The Garden House includes features like hand hewn oak beams made by WPA craftsmen and unique animal carvings. Boerner Botanical Gardens is also home to many sculptures and unique stonework, much of it dating from 1930's WPA artists and artisans. The Gardens also feature contemporary sculptures and other artwork by area artists.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
 
  

The Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania Awarded Level IV Accreditation

The Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania has been awarded a Level IV Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, The Morris Arboretum is now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how The Morris Arboretum tells their story:

Set on 166 acres at the outer edge of Philadelphia's Chestnut Hill neighborhood, the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania Founded in 1887 as the private estate of siblings John and Lydia T. Morris. The arboretum was established in 1932 as a university-administered arboretum and public garden for research, education and horticultural display. It became the official Arboretum of the Commonwealth in 1988.

Today, the Morris Arboretum treats visitors to an ever-changing display of rare and beautiful plants and trees, all year long. It is a place of big trees, a place of beauty, a historic landscape, a scientific institution, a teaching garden, a place of art and architecture, and a place of peace and healing. At the arboretum, one discovers teaching, horticultural display, conservation and research.

The Arboretum assists communities and agencies throughout the state, region, and the United States. The magnificent garden displays showcase the region's best horticultural practices and plant selections. Arboretum staff lead plant collecting expeditions to Asia, Europe, and in the United States, seeking to increase and conserve the diversity of plants available for today's urban and community landscapes. Arboretum research on Pennsylvania's plants and plant communities, the Flora of Pennsylvania, is a vital resource for environmental stewardship. The Plants of Pennsylvania: An Illustrated Manual, written and researched by Morris Arboretum botanists Ann Rhoads and Timothy is a tool for the identification of the native and naturalized plants of the state.

The Morris Arboretum's collection of scientifically documented plants began in the late 1800's. More than 12,000 labeled plants of over 2,500 types from the temperate areas of North America, Asia, Africa, and Europe make its living collection. Some of these were collected by Arboretum founders, John and Lydia Morris, from their travels around the world. Plants collected in China by E.H. Wilson in the later 1800's and early 1900s form the foundation of the historic Asian collection. Significant plant collections include conifers, hollies, magnolia, oaks, maples, roses, flowering cherries, and witchhazels.

The Morris Arboretum encourages active participation in the garden with its members. Arboretum members provide over five hundred Arboretum volunteers. Educational programs, from floral and landscape design to painting in the outdoors, are offered to the general public, while professional arborists can take courses in such specialized techniques as tree cabling and bracing.

The Arboretum remains an important regional open space and a national example of a Victorian eclectic garden. The Arboretum is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is accredited by the American Association of Museums.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
 
  

Westonbirt, The National Arboretum Awarded Level IV Accreditation

Westonbirt, The National Arboretum in England has been awarded a Level IV Accreditation through the ArbNet program. By achieving particular standards of professional practices deemed important for arboreta and botanic gardens, Westonbirt, which in managed by the Forestry Commission is now recognized amongst other professional public gardens in the Morton Register of Arboreta.

Here's how Westonbirt tells their story:

Westonbirt, The National Arboretum is a remarkable place for people to enjoy and learn about trees. Its combination of maturity, species diversity and landscape style make it one of the most extraordinary arboretums in the world with an iconic status in our tree and landscape heritage. The tree collection itself contains around 16,000 catalogued trees and shrubs from 3000 plant taxa. There are also 5 National Plant Collections including Japanese maples for which the arboretum is so well known.

Created in the 19th Century by Victorian entrepreneur Robert Holford, the 240 hectare (600 acre) arboretum was planted during the period of unprecedented introduction and availability of new plants to UK growers. Holford's wealth allowed him access to these newly introduced species and his arboretum is an extravagant expression of his passion for trees. Laid out in a relatively short period, the treescape owes much to the earlier Picturesque landscape style and Holford's regard for and adherence to the landscape principles of William Sawrey Gilpin.

Since 1956 the arboretum has been managed as a public institution by The Forestry Commission. As such it has taken on a broad range of objectives from plant conservation and scientific research to recreation and learning. The arboretum's mission to Connect People with Trees to Improve the Quality of Life encompasses these broad objectives and reflects its inclusive ethos.

In 1985, the Friends of Westonbirt Arboretum charity was formed to support the Forestry Commission. The charity has since gone on to become a major membership organisation providing significant financial and practical contributions.

In 2001, Westonbirt was awarded the status of National Arboretum, further emphasising both the quality of the tree collection and the exemplary maintenance and curation that underline its value as a reference collection of temperate trees and shrubs. The arboretum's tree collection and woodland areas have contributed to a wide range of scientific research programmes. The growing threats to trees and forests from climate change and pests and disease have prompted a reaffirmation of the arboretum's value for understanding these threats and developing appropriate responses.

As well as the tree collection itself, Westonbirt Arboretum is a popular visitor attraction with around 400,000 visitors a year. It also supports a range of educational programmes and learning activities. Some of these cater for specific users while others provide the means by which all visitors have the opportunity to learn more about the arboretum and the wider world of trees. The latter includes guided walks and interpretation of many kinds including (increasingly) electronic and web-based media such as social media and blogs. Our work to raise public understanding of the environment issues relating to trees is perhaps the most significant contribution the arboretum makes to plant conservation.

ArbNet, the Morton Register and the Accreditation Program are coordinated by The Morton Arboretum as an international initiative to support the work of arboreta in saving and planting trees.

 
 
  
 

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ArbNet

ArbNet is an online, interactive community of arboreta that supports the common purposes and interests of tree-focused public gardens. More. ArbNet is sponsored and coordinated by The Morton Arboretum; inquiries to ArbNet@mortonarb.org.

Morton Register of Arboreta

The Morton Register of Arboreta is a comprehensive list and database of arboreta and other public gardens that have a substantial focus on woody plants. More. Accreditation for arboreta is also available. Sponsored and coordinated by The Morton Arboretum (www.mortonarb.org).

What is an Arboretum?

An arboretum is a specialized type of botanical garden that focuses on trees and other woody plants. More. A principal goal of arboreta is to encourage and support the planting and conservation of trees.
 
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